2018 Grantee Partners


In 2018, The members of The Women’s Fund of Winston-Salem awarded nearly $110,000 in grants to eight local nonprofit organizations to address the economic security of women and girls in Forsyth County.


Community Grants Program

Authoring Action is awarded $15,000 for Girl to Girl, a program that offers life preparedness workshops and writing workshops. Preparedness workshops will help girls explore their struggles, dreams and goals while writing workshops will help girls improve their verbal and writing skills.  Participants for the program will be recruited from Authoring Action’s Summer Intensive Program and other girls who are at risk of low academic attainment.

Crosby Scholars is awarded $10,000 for the SHE project, a program designed to use a holistic approach to address root causes of poverty. This project will guide African American and Latina girls in areas of concentrated poverty living in Forsyth County to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).  The SHE Program will work with Map Forsyth to identify 7th grade girls who live in areas of concentrated poverty and attend Title 1 schools.

Delicious by Shereen is awarded $15,000 to provide valuable economic opportunities to under- and unemployed women in the refugee community and foster a shared sense of community between local residents and newly resettled refugees.  Refugee women will gain culinary skills that will translate into increased economic security while providing the opportunity to build strong relationships.  One-on-one interactions provide opportunities for personable dialogue and the breakdown of barriers so that people can get to know each other and nurture an authentic and sincere sense of community. 
 
LEAD Girls is awarded $10,000 for the continuation of funding to recruit, educate, and support pre-teen and early teen girls, equipping them to navigate their teen years and avoid risky behaviors such as poor academic performance, substance use, sexual promiscuity, and teen pregnancy. The program targets girls ages 11 – 15 years old who reside in Winston-Salem and Forsyth County.   LEAD will specifically work with Wiley Middle School, Philo-Hill Magnet School Academy, and Mineral Springs.  
 
Planned Parenthood South Atlantic is awarded $15,000 to conduct educational programming that will help combat teen pregnancy.  Programming includes Get Real, Making Proud Choices, Smart Girls, and the Health Improvement Project for Teens.  Planned Parenthood will continue to provide resources that will help parents and caregivers support their teens through programs such as Parents Matter.  Program participants will come from three main schools: Philo-Hill Middle School, Mineral Springs Middle School, and Walkertown Middle School.
 
Salvation Army is awarded $14,685 for the Center of Hope Life Skills Program.  The program hopes to address the specific causes of homelessness by empowering women and girls in their shelter through education and skill development to prevent future homeless episodes.  Staff will develop programming based on the individual needs of each participant and feedback from participants will help to enhance current programming. 
 
The Parenting PATH (formerly SCAN) is awarded is awarded $15,000 for their new Trauma Informed Coping Practices Program.  This evidence-based approach will increase the resilience of life-stressors, such as trauma, for families in the program.  The Parenting PATH staff will each be trained to work one-on-one with family members, helping them to develop coping mechanisms through mindfulness techniques that can be used to diffuse stressful situations as they occur.  Understanding that seeking therapy is not an option for all women due to financial barriers, transportation, and childcare issues, this coping technique can be performed anywhere and is free of charge.  
 
YMCA of Northwest North Carolina is awarded $15,000 for R.I.S.E (Refugee and Immigrant Society of Entrepreneurs).  R.I.S.E provides opportunities for refugee and immigrant women to learn skills and develop small businesses.  Using the YMCA’s Learning Center as a “Makerspace”, women can craft, sew, and sell their goods and products.  R.I.S.E is part of the Y’s Adult Literacy Program and is designed as a strategic value proposition that facilitates the primary goal of the Y’s ESL Program: providing adults with language skills and soft skills necessary to obtain and retain employment.  Funding will be used to improve business management skills, verbal and written communication skills, and sales opportunities. 

 
El Buen Pastor Latino Community Services is awarded $24,500 for economic empowerment of women in the Latino community. The Economic Empowerment Program will offer entrepreneurship training, workshops, networking, seed funding, and hands-on experiences to an initial cohort of 10 women seeking to start their own businesses. A Program Director will partner with each woman as she works through her business plan. Since its creation in 2006, El Buen Pastor has provided services to young children, teens, and parents with a focus on education, offering Latino families opportunities for a brighter future.
 
Habitat for Humanity of Forsyth County is awarded $15,664 for a home maintenance workshop pilot program for women. This program will provide hands-on maintenance experience to 60 women Forsyth County, helping them reduce expensive repair needs that can compromise family safety and contribute to neighborhood blight. About 80% of Habitat families are headed by single women who are supporting one or more children. These workshops will help build the capacity of women to become successful homeowners. 
 
Imprints Cares is awarded $29,997 for programs to prevent teenage pregnancy and to support teenage mothers. Imprints Cares at Downtown Health Plaza will target low-income, unwed teen girls, young mothers, and expectant young mothers who receive services at the Downtown Health Plaza and are referred by medical providers. Imprints will offer parenting services such as home visitations, group connections, child screenings, and resource networking and referrals. These services will help support young women in an effort to break the cycle of poverty, which is a major cause and consequence of teenage pregnancy.
 
Old Town Elementary School is awarded $7,550 for “Full STEM Ahead,” an after-school STEM club for girls who attend Old Town Elementary. Research shows that stereotypes start at a young age when girls’ experience with science and math are gender-linked in ways that negatively affect their perceptions of scientific learning. This program will feature hands-on activities and field trip destinations that are based on the 4th and 5th grade North Carolina Science and Math Curricula in an effort to increase the girls’ interest in science and math careers and self-perceptions of their abilities in these subjects.  
 
 
And finally,
 
Planned Parenthood South Atlantic is awarded $30,000 to implement the Contraceptive Choice project which will educate low-income teenagers about contraceptive methods and empower them to choose the method that works for their needs. Many patients forgo the contraceptive method that is best for them because of the cost, and this program will educate young women on their options for these services. Birth control options counseling, long-acting, reversible contraceptive methods which are safe to use, and insertion of these devices, will be offered at no-cost.
 
 Authoring Action is awarded $15,000 for Girl to Girl, a program that offers life preparedness workshops and writing workshops. Preparedness workshops will help girls explore their struggles, dreams and goals while writing workshops will help girls improve their verbal and writing skills.  Participants for the program will be recruited from Authoring Action’s Summer Intensive Program and other girls who are at risk of low academic attainment.
 Crosby Scholars is awarded $10,000 for the SHE project, a program designed to use a holistic approach to address root causes of poverty. This project will guide African American and Latina girls in areas of concentrated poverty living in Forsyth County to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).  The SHE Program will work with Map Forsyth to identify 7th grade girls who live in areas of concentrated poverty and attend Title 1 schools.
 Delicious by Shereen is awarded $15,000 to provide valuable economic opportunities to under- and unemployed women in the refugee community and foster a shared sense of community between local residents and newly resettled refugees.  Refugee women will gain culinary skills that will translate into increased economic security while providing the opportunity to build strong relationships.  One-on-one interactions provide opportunities for personable dialogue and the breakdown of barriers so that people can get to know each other and nurture an authentic and sincere sense of community. 
 LEAD Girls is awarded $10,000 for the continuation of funding to recruit, educate, and support pre-teen and early teen girls, equipping them to navigate their teen years and avoid risky behaviors such as poor academic performance, substance use, sexual promiscuity, and teen pregnancy. The program targets girls ages 11 – 15 years old who reside in Winston-Salem and Forsyth County.   LEAD will specifically work with Wiley Middle School, Philo-Hill Magnet School Academy, and Mineral Springs.  
 Planned Parenthood South Atlantic is awarded $15,000 to conduct educational programming that will help combat teen pregnancy.  Programming includes Get Real, Making Proud Choices, Smart Girls, and the Health Improvement Project for Teens.  Planned Parenthood will continue to provide resources that will help parents and caregivers support their teens through programs such as Parents Matter.  Program participants will come from three main schools: Philo-Hill Middle School, Mineral Springs Middle School, and Walkertown Middle School.
 Salvation Army is awarded $14,685 for the Center of Hope Life Skills Program.  The program hopes to address the specific causes of homelessness by empowering women and girls in their shelter through education and skill development to prevent future homeless episodes.  Staff will develop programming based on the individual needs of each participant and feedback from participants will help to enhance current programming.  
The Parenting PATH is awarded is awarded $15,000 for their new Trauma Informed Coping Practices Program.  This evidence-based approach will increase the resilience of life-stressors, such as trauma, for families in the program.  The Parenting PATH staff will each be trained to work one-on-one with family members, helping them to develop coping mechanisms through mindfulness techniques that can be used to diffuse stressful situations as they occur.  Understanding that seeking therapy is not an option for all women due to financial barriers, transportation, and childcare issues, this coping technique can be performed anywhere and is free of charge.  
 YMCA of Northwest North Carolina is awarded $15,000 for R.I.S.E (Refugee and Immigrant Society of Entrepreneurs).  R.I.S.E provides opportunities for refugee and immigrant women to learn skills and develop small businesses.  Using the YMCA’s Learning Center as a “Makerspace”, women can craft, sew, and sell their goods and products.  R.I.S.E is part of the Y’s Adult Literacy Program and is designed as a strategic value proposition that facilitates the primary goal of the Y’s ESL Program: providing adults with language skills and soft skills necessary to obtain and retain employment.  Funding will be used to improve business management skills, verbal and written communication skills, and sales opportunities.
 
 
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